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Burning Team members spend most of their time here for creating amazing arts and animations for various international clients.

A powerful technique that has come up, as digital painting and designing has become more and more prevalent in the concept artist industry. There are two key factors when it comes to 2D ideation--the illusion of speed, or more accurately the tradeoff between short term gains and exponential long term losses, and the “hoarding” of design acumen to just the concept department at the studio. 3D renders provide a fantastic plate to paint on, reference model figures that you can design on top of, automatic perfect perspective for scenes, and tons more. They can also offer some great realistic texture and models for your scenes.



In 3D computer graphics, 3D modeling (or three-dimensional modeling) is the process of developing a mathematical representation of any surface of an object (either inanimate or living) in three dimensions via specialized software. The product is called a 3D model.

3D modeling is used in various industries like films, animation and gaming, interior designing and architecture. They are also used in the medical industry for the interactive representations of anatomy. 3D modelling is also used in the field of Industrial Design, wherein products are 3D modeled before representing them to the clients. In Media and Event industries, 3D modelling is used in Stage/Set Design.

3D rigging is the process of creating a skeleton for a 3D model so it can move. Most commonly, characters are rigged before they are animated because if a character model doesn't have a rig, they can't be deformed and moved around. A character rig is essentially a digital skeleton bound to the 3D mesh. Like a real skeleton, a rig is made up of joints and bones, each of which acts as a "handle" that animators can use to bend the character into the desired pose.



A new technique for generating shaded relief images to show the three-dimensional structure. of Texture mapping originally referred to a method (now more accurately called diffuse mapping) that simply wrapped and mapped pixels from a texture to a 3D surface. A texture is an image applied (mapped) to the surface of a shape or polygon. This may be a bitmap image or a procedural texture.

They may be stored in common image file formats, referenced by 3d model formats or material definitions, and assembled into resource bundles

Shading refers to depicting depth perception in 3D models or illustrations by varying levels of darkness. Shading is the process of altering the color of an object/surface/polygon in the 3D scene, based on things like (but not limited to) the surface's angle to lights, its distance from lights, its angle to the camera and material properties (e.g. bidirectional reflectance distribution function).



3D animation consists of varying properties of a 3 dimensional scene defined in numerical quantities. The computer-intensive process of generating hundreds of rendered images together with the difficulty and labor-intensive processes required for defining 3 dimensional movements makes the exploration of 3D animation the almost exclusive property of large budget film and TV productions.

Two states of this deformation process can be used as key frames for the generation of an animated twist or bend.



Motion capture (Mo-cap for short) is the process of recording the movement of objects or people. In filmmaking and video game development, it refers to recording actions of human actors, and using that information to animate digital character models in 2D or 3D computer animation. When it includes face and fingers or captures subtle expressions, it is often referred to as performance capture. In many fields, motion capture is sometimes called motion tracking, but in filmmaking and games, motion tracking usually refers more to match moving.



A matte painting is a painted representation of a landscape, set, or distant location that allows filmmakers to create the illusion of an environment that is not present at the filming location. Historically, matte painters and film technicians have used various techniques to combine a matte-painted image with live-action footage. At its best, depending on the skill levels of the artists and technicians, the effect is "seamless" and creates environments that would otherwise be impossible or expensive to film. In the scenes the painting part is static and movements are integrated on it.



Computer graphics lighting refers to the simulation of light in computer graphics. This simulation can either be extremely accurate, as is the case in an application like Radiance which attempts to track the energy flow of light interacting with materials using radiosity computational techniques. Alternatively, the simulation can simply be inspired by light physics, as is the case with non-photorealistic rendering. In both cases, a shading model is used to describe how surfaces respond to light. Between these two extremes, there are many different rendering approaches which can be employed to achieve almost any desired visual result.



Rendering or image synthesis is the automatic process of generating a photorealistic or non-photorealistic image from a 2D or 3D model (or models in what collectively could be called a scene file) by means of computer programs. Also, the results of displaying such a model can be called a render. A scene file contains objects in a strictly defined language or data structure; it would contain geometry, viewpoint, texture, lighting, and shading information as a description of the virtual scene. In 3D computer graphics process of automatically converting 3D wire frame models into 2D images on a computer. 3D renders may include photorealistic effects or non-photorealistic rendering.



Visual Effects (abbreviated VFX) is the process by which imagery is created or manipulated outside the context of a live action shot in film making. Visual effects involve in the integration of live-action footage (special effects) and generated imagery (digital effects) to create environments which look realistic, but would be dangerous, expensive, impractical, time consuming or impossible to capture on film



Compositing is the combining of visual elements from separate sources into single images, often to create the illusion that all those elements are parts of the same scene. Live-action shooting for compositing is variously called "Chroma key", "blue screen", "green screen" and other names. Today, most, though not all, compositing is achieved through digital image manipulation. All compositing involves the replacement of selected parts of an image with other material, usually, but not always, from another image.